Flag Day

By Carrie Blough, Curator, Historical Society of Frederick County | Photography by Turner Photography Studio | Posted on 11.05.13 – History, Timepiece

Winfield Scott Schley, rear admiral during the Spanish-American War, was born at Richfield, on what is now U.S. 15 north of Frederick. He returned to Frederick for a visit just after his July 1898 victory in the war, where he gained the moniker “the hero of Santiago de Cuba.” What better place to welcome a hero home than the recently constructed trolley station at Braddock Heights?

On Nov. 19, 1898, Schley, his wife and a regiment of prominent Frederick County citizens gathered at Braddock Heights to properly honor the victor. Schley and his wife even scored their own car for a commemorative trolley ride. Did Schley wonder that the newly minted resort town of Braddock Heights was now the place to be in Frederick? When he was a youngster, Braddock Heights did not even exist.

The seed for the passenger trolley line was planted only six years earlier. Scouts scoured the countryside and unanimously settled on the bucolic region at the top of the mountain, between Frederick and Middletown. Residents of the Middletown Valley were hopeful of a means of transportation to shorten their journey to the city; a trolley would be the ideal solution. Once the route was selected, the resort town was planned in tandem. The location was the perfect setting for vacationers to escape the city heat of the summer and allow them to party in the country. Construction began on the community and the trolley in 1894, with the rails open for business by the middle of 1896.

Schley’s visit two years later helped seal Braddock Heights’ destiny as the place for the well-to-do. He was given a hero’s welcome, complete with flags and fanfare. One of the flags was kept as a token of the day’s event. It includes the date and notes that “bells rang” on the day of Schley’s visit to Braddock Heights.

Flag Day

Curator, Historical Society Of Frederick County

By Carrie Blough | Photography by Tuner Photography Studio | Posted on 11.01.13 – History, Timepiece

Winfield Scott Schley, rear admiral during the Spanish-American War, was born at Richfield, on what is now U.S. 15 north of Frederick. He returned to Frederick for a visit just after his July 1898 victory in the war, where he gained the moniker “the hero of Santiago de Cuba.” What better place to welcome a hero home than the recently constructed trolley station at Braddock Heights?

On Nov. 19, 1898, Schley, his wife and a regiment of prominent Frederick County citizens gathered at Braddock Heights to properly honor the victor. Schley and his wife even scored their own car for a commemorative trolley ride. Did Schley wonder that the newly minted resort town of Braddock Heights was now the place to be in Frederick? When he was a youngster, Braddock Heights did not even exist.

The seed for the passenger trolley line was planted only six years earlier. Scouts scoured the countryside and unanimously settled on the bucolic region at the top of the mountain, between Frederick and Middletown. Residents of the Middletown Valley were hopeful of a means of transportation to shorten their journey to the city; a trolley would be the ideal solution. Once the route was selected, the resort town was planned in tandem. The location was the perfect setting for vacationers to escape the city heat of the summer and allow them to party in the country. Construction began
on the community and the trolley in 1894, with the rails open for business by the middle of 1896.

Schley’s visit two years later helped seal Braddock Heights’ destiny as the place for the well-to-do. He was given a hero’s
welcome, complete with flags and fanfare. One of the flags was kept as a token of the day’s event. It includes the date and notes that “bells rang” on the day of Schley’s visit to Braddock Heights.